Category: Sports

Roaring to the Finals: Why the Raptors Can Upset Cleveland

Friends, I come bearing good news: April has come. You had to spend the last three weeks watching bricked free throws and horrifying midrange jumpers. Worst of all, you had to pretend to enjoy it, using gambling to trick yourself into an emotional investment. The pain is over. The playoffs are here. This article is… Read more »

Barca’s Comeback Is Further Proof That We Are Living in a Computer Simulation

  What a night in the world of soccer. On Wednesday, F.C. Barcelona actually erased a 4–0 first leg deficit to knock off Paris-Saint Germain 6–1 at home and advance to the Champions League Quarterfinals. No team has ever come back from four goals down in the knockout round of the Champions League, but Barcelona… Read more »

Demarcus Cousins and the Power of Unintended Consequences

On February 19, Demarcus Cousins was traded from the Sacramento Kings to the New Orleans Pelicans. Cousins is, by consensus, a top player in the NBA. Indeed, he is one of the most talented scoring centers the game has seen in years. Yet, for a multitude of reasons, the Kings felt obligated to trade him…. Read more »

Light Years Behind: The History Lesson Edition

Welcome to the third installment of Light Years Behind, a (hopefully) weekly look into the National Basketball Association. Editor’s Note: if you come here expecting the in-depth analysis offered elsewhere at the Bowdoin Globalist, then PROCEED NO FURTHER. What follows is an exercise in whimsical nonsense. Mo Williams Transactions: An Oral History After opting into… Read more »

Light Years Behind: All-Star Edition

Welcome to the first installment of Light Years Behind, a (hopefully) weekly look into the National Basketball Association. Editor’s Note: if you come here expecting the in-depth analysis offered elsewhere at the Bowdoin Globalist, then PROCEED NO FURTHER. What follows is an exercise in whimsical nonsense. Which NBA Players Embarrass Themselves the Most? A Completely… Read more »

Hoops and Ladders: The Road to the NBA’s New Collective Bargaining Agreement

In 2011, representatives of the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the National Basketball Players Association, the labor union representing the league’s players, sat down to renegotiate their collective bargaining agreement (CBA), a contract between the two organizations that sets the rules for player contracts, revenue distribution, and salary caps, among other things. At its core,… Read more »

Equal Athleticism, Unequal Appreciation

Less than a month after the 2016 Rio Olympics, Michael Phelps was on the “Tonight Show” cracking a raw egg on his forehead. Yes, the most decorated Olympian of all time lost to Jimmy Fallon, the show’s host, in a game of “Egg Roulette,” in which contestants pull and crack eggs from a carton containing… Read more »

Cognitive Dissonance and Minor League Wages

In February 2014, three retired Minor League Baseball players brought a lawsuit against their former teams and Major League Baseball, claiming unfair pay practices. The case, Aaron Senne v. Office of the Commissioner of Baseball, is in the pre-trial phase, with no settlement in sight. The plaintiffs argue that MLB has violated the Fair Labor… Read more »

Gender Testing in the Olympics

Caster Semenya , a South African runner, first came under scrutiny for her appearance in 2009. As the New York Times reported, the South African National Olympic Committee called in Semenya for testing. The committee did not tell her what the tests were for, and she did not consent to gender testing; nevertheless, she soon… Read more »

Losing the Game

American professional sports have a tendency to get wrapped up in grand narratives. The N.B.A. star who was homeless in high school but now makes millions on the court. The baseball team that makes an improbable and unprecedented September run. The hat trick. The Cinderella story. The Hail Mary. Professional sports have also created the… Read more »